Watch Movies: 40 Best Action Movies That Must Be On Your Watchlist

Action films is all about larger than life visions. Action movies present big, amazing, improbable, impossible and spectacular display of events.

It’s the high energy of action films – with their high speed chases, exciting fights, and often mesmerizing violence – that keeps audiences glued to their seats.

Action films take advantage of this aspect to the fullest, constantly pushing the boundaries and capturing increasingly gripping sequences of motion.

The best action movies deliver a gripping plot along with the requisite jaw-dropping fight scenes, and Hollywood is full of great examples.These movies find wide appeal because of their ability to tap into various audiences.

Here Are Newszii’s Picks For The Best Action Movies Ever Made.

 

1. Justice League

Justice League Dark (2017) Justice League Dark is what it sounds like. It’s the dark side of justice. A group of supernatural heroes who band together loosely to take on occult threats, supernatural threats – threats that the real Justice League may be powerless against. Available here…

Review: San Diego Reader

Did you like Joss Whedon’s The Avengers? Then you’ll love, or at least maybe be able to mostly tolerate, Justice League, and not just because Whedon helped out with the script and direction. Read Full Review…

 

2. War for the Planet of the Apes

Caesar and his apes are forced into a deadly conflict with an army of humans led by a ruthless Colonel. After the apes suffer unimaginable losses, Caesar wrestles with his darker instincts and begins his own mythic quest to avenge his kind.

As the journey finally brings them face to face, Caesar and the Colonel are pitted against each other in an epic battle that will determine the fate of both their species and the future of the planet. Click Here For Movie…

Review: Star-Telegram

Who would have thought that a bunch of chattering apes would have so much to say?

But “War for the Planet of the Apes,” the finale in the “Planet of the Apes” reboot trilogy that began with the surprisingly satisfying “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” in 2011 and continued with the darkly impressive “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes” in 2014, is smart, funny and moving. Read Full Review…

 

3. Blade Runner 2049

Thirty years after the events of the first film, a new blade runner, LAPD Officer K (Ryan Gosling), unearths a long-buried secret that has the potential to plunge what’s left of society into chaos. K’s discovery leads him on a quest to find Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), a former LAPD blade runner who has been missing for 30 years. Watch Here…

Review: Vulture

Maybe it’s that his icy demeanor is undercut whenever he speaks, sounding like he studied Marlon Brando a bit too much and for all the wrong reasons. Perhaps it’s because his body bristles with anxiety and discomfort, as if he isn’t convinced of his own brooding. Read Full Review…

 

4. Star Wars: The Last Jedi

The film picks up immediately after Episode VII: The Force Awakens, after Force-sensitive scavenger Rey (Daisy Ridley) finally tracks down powerful Jedi Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) to train and help the Resistance defeat the First Order. Visit Here…

Review: Chicagoreader

In 1997, when I was eight years old, my father took me and my sisters to see the first three Star Wars movies, which were being rolled out in U.S. theaters in January, February, and March of that year to mark the franchise’s 20th anniversary.

After each viewing, he would take us out for milk shakes and question us about the film’s themes. “What does the Force mean to you?” he’d ask. “What is the difference between the dark side and the light?” Read Full Review…

 

5. Blade Runner

Blade Runner 2049 Thirty years after the events of the first film, a new blade runner, LAPD Officer K (Ryan Gosling), unearths a long-buried secret that has the potential to plunge what’s left of society into chaos. K’s discovery leads him on a quest to find Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), a former LAPD blade runner who has been missing for 30 years. Watch Here…

Review: The Washington Post

The pictorially stunning new science-fiction detective thriller “Blade Runner,” opening today at area theaters, certainly reflects the description forecast by director Ridley Scott: “A film set 40 years hence, made in the style of 40 years ago.” Read Full Review…

 

6. The Dark Tower

The last Gunslinger, Roland Deschain, has been locked in an eternal battle with Walter O’Dim, also known as the Man in Black, determined to prevent him from toppling the Dark Tower, which holds the universe together. With the fate of the worlds at stake, good and evil will collide in the ultimate battle as only Roland can defend the Tower from the Man in Black.Watch Now…

Review: The Village Voice

Yes, you’ve heard it’s bad. It is. But there are some things to like in The Dark Tower, directed by Nikolaj Arcel, the new adaptation of Stephen King’s epic novel series. Just as in the books, an evil sorcerer named The Man in Black (Matthew McConaughey) orders around his henchpeople — actually rat people — who must don human skin suits to travel around Keystone Earth undetected. Read Full Review…

 

7. Thor: Ragnarok

Imprisoned, the mighty Thor finds himself in a lethal gladiatorial contest against the Hulk, his former ally. Thor must fight for survival and race against time to prevent the all-powerful Hela from destroying his home and the Asgardian civilization. Get One…

Review: Salon

I didn’t need to look at the early box office projections to know that “Thor: Ragnarok” was going to be a hit. As soon as I saw the giant lines curled up for yards outside my movie theater, I deduced that Marvel was looking at yet another of its runaway successes. Hell, even a quick glance at the positive reception to the “Thor: Ragnarok” trailers was a fair indication of positive audience response. Read Full Review…

 

8. Amityville: The Awakening

Belle, her little sister, and her comatose twin brother move into a new house with their single mother Joan in order to save money to help pay for her brother’s expensive healthcare.

But when strange phenomena begin to occur in the house including the miraculous recovery of her brother, Belle begins to suspect her Mother isn’t telling her everything and soon realizes they just moved into the infamous Amityville house. Watch Online….

Review: Philly

Honestly, the most alarming thing about Amityville: The Awakening, the long-delayed 18th (!) film in the Amityville Horror series, is the name “Weinstein” splashed all over the opening credits.

Read Full Review…

 

9. Deadpool 2

A fast-talking mercenary with a morbid sense of humor is subjected to a rogue experiment that leaves him with accelerated healing powers and a quest for revenge. Available Here…

Review: The newYorker

In many ways, “Deadpool 2” is an improvement on its predecessor. Like the first film in the series, it’s largely a comedy, because of the torrent of snark that the protagonist (Ryan Reynolds) spouts, onscreen and in voice-over, from beginning to end—and because much of the action, even when it deals with earnest matters, is shaped to match these antic attitudes. The drama of “Deadpool 2” is more sharply focussed than in the earlier film. Read Full Review…

 

10. It

It (2017) In the Town of Derry, the local kids are disappearing one by one, leaving behind bloody remains. In a place known as ‘The Barrens’, a group of seven kids are united by their horrifying and strange encounters with an evil clown and their determination to kill It. Watch Online…

Review: The Muse

What do scary clowns and nostalgia have in common? They are equally obvious and effective devices. Also, they are the air in the balloon of Andy Muschietti’s new version of It.

I don’t want to begrudge the pragmatist filmmaker for taking the direct route and giving the people what they want, especially because this is a reasonable strategy in such a visceral genre as horror, but asserting that clowns are scary or that nostalgia is pleasurable. Read Full Review…

 

11. Kingsman: The Golden Circle

When their headquarters are destroyed and the world is held hostage, the Kingsman’s journey leads them to the discovery of an allied spy organization in the US. These two elite secret organizations must band together to defeat a common enemy. Click Here…

Review: The Atlantic

When Kingsman: The Secret Service landed in theaters two years ago, it was a surprising, if modestly guilty, pleasure. For more than 30 years—going back at least as far as Never Say Never Again—James Bond had been derided within his own franchise as a “dinosaur,” for his tailored suits, sexist attitudes, and proclivity for violence. Read Full Review…

 

12. Professor Marston and the Wonder Women

This man single-handedly created Wonder Woman, the fearless, righteous and gorgeous comic-book character that the entire world came to love and respect. Back when he released it, the book generated a lot of controversies.

Apart from coming up with one of the finest heroines in history, the man was also one of the key inventors of the so-called lie detector test. He was in a polyamorous relationship with his wife and a student. Click Here…

Review: The Atlantic

The life stories being told in Professor Marston and the Wonder Women are truly radical. William Marston (Luke Evans) was a psychologist and university professor who helped invent the lie detector in the 1920s and created the character of Wonder Woman for DC Comics in 1941. Read Full Review…

 

13. The Hitman’s Bodyguard

The Hitmans Bodyguard (2017) The world’s top bodyguard gets a new client, a hit man who must testify at the International Court of Justice. They must put their differences aside and work together to make it to the trial on time. Purchase Here…

Review: Philly

If Brando’s Terry Malloy could’ve been a contender, Ray Stevenson’s Greene – a real-life stevedore turned union boss turned mob-connected Cleveland folk hero – definitely was one. But comparisons to On the Waterfront can stop right there. Kill the Irishman, from director Jonathan Hensleigh (The Punisher), is the kind of artless crime-world saga that telegraphs its punches and stocks its smoky bars with muscle from The Sopranos.  Read Full Review…

 

14. The Snowman

Harry, the famed and respected detective of a top-notch crime unit is investigating the abduction of an innocent civilian on the 1st snow of winter. As he digs deeper into this case, the detective starts to suspect that a notorious serial killer is back to murdering people. Watch Here…

Review: BuzzFeedNews

The Snowman is made up of all the right parts. The cast, which includes Michael Fassbender, Rebecca Ferguson, Charlotte Gainsbourg, and J.K. Simmons, is first-rate. The source material is an acclaimed best-selling Norwegian mystery novel. The story is the kind of brainy serial killer tale that’s oh so hot right now. Read Full Review…

 

15. Baby Driver

The movie tells the story of talented getaway driver Baby (Ansel Elgort). After being coerced into working for a robbery syndicate managed by Doc (Kevin Spacey), Baby finds himself taking part in a heist doomed to fail.Visit Here…

Review: ChicagoReader

Writer-director Edgar Wright (Shaun of the Dead) has been mashing up genres since he was an amateur filmmaker in his teens; here he tweaks the caper film by replacing the familiar figure of the aging protagonist who’s in for one last score with a fresh-faced kid (Ansel Elgort) who’s in debt to a criminal mastermind (Kevin Spacey). Read Full Review…

 

16. Friday the 13th

A group of camp counsellors is stalked and murdered by an unknown assailant while trying to reopen a summer camp which, years before, was the site of a child’s drowning. One summer at Camp Crystal Lake, a group of young counsellors begin to get ready to lead campers. Watch Online….

Review: The HollywoodReporte

It may be hard to remember, but there was a time when the name Jason Vorhees wasn’t part of the horror lexicon. In 1980 director Sean S. Cunningham unleashed the original Friday the 13th, a film that would go on to define the slasher era through sequel after profitable sequel (though Jason’s iconic hockey mask wouldn’t actually show up until the third instalment in 1982). Read Full Review…

 

17. Star Wars: The Force Awakens

The Star Wars saga continues with this seventh entry — the first under the Walt Disney Co. umbrella. The film will act as the start of a new trilogy set after the events of Return of the Jedi. J.J. Abrams directs from a script by Michael Arndt. ~ Jeremy Wheeler, Rovi. Get One Here….

Review: The New Yorker

The director J. J. Abrams infuses the latest installment of George Lucas’s intergalactic franchise with the spirit of Steven Spielberg in this awestruck, warmhearted, and good-humored action spectacle.

It’s centered on the search for Luke Skywalker by the organized Resistance to the evil dominion of the First Order. That oppressive successor to the Empire wants to extinguish the last of the Jedi, whose help the Resistance fighters need. Read Full Review…

 

18. Gerald’s Game

While trying to spice up her marriage in a remote lake house, a woman must suddenly fight to survive when she is left handcuffed to a bed.

Review: The Hollywood Reporter

Making your horror movie stand out from its peers isn’t easy. You’re competing in a genre with a low buy-in that begets high ubiquity; literally anybody with access to cameras and corn syrup, plus a troupe of actors game enough to play dead onscreen, can knock out a quickie horror project without breaking either a sweat or the bank. Read Full Review…

 

19. Happy Death Day

A teenage girl, trying to enjoy her birthday, soon realizes that this is her final one. That is, if she can figure out who her killer is. She must relive that day, over and over again, dying in a different way each time. Can she solve her own murder? Visit Here…

Review: TimeOut

What would you do if you found yourself repeatedly re-experiencing your own murder? It’s a scary and compelling premise, but in answering that question, Happy Death Day aims less at horror devotees and more at teenagers, taking a breezy, CW-esque approach to questions of fate. Read Full Review…

 

20. The Foreigner – 2017

A humble businessman with a buried past seeks justice when his daughter is killed in an act of terrorism. A cat-and-mouse conflict ensues with a government official, whose past may hold clues to the killers’ identities. Get One…

Review: Reel Film Reviews

It was inevitable, but it appears as though Steven Seagal has finally gone the Van Damme route. Instead of praying for sidekick roles in lame theatrical action flicks (Half Past Dead, anyone?), Seagal’s begun appearing in leading roles in straight-to-video productions – beginning with The Foreigner. Read Full Review…

 

21.Goodbye Christopher Robin

A rare glimpse into the relationship between beloved children’s author A. A. Milne (Domhnall Gleeson) and his son Christopher Robin, whose toys inspired the magical world of Winnie the Pooh.

Along with his mother Daphne (Margot Robbie), and his nanny Olive, Christopher Robin and his family are swept up in the international success of the books. Purchase Here…

Review: The Detroit News

Turns out the story of Winnie the Pooh is a real Eeyore. “Goodbye Christopher Robin” tells the tale of the creation of Winnie the Pooh, one of the best-loved children’s stories and characters of all-time. While it was a creative triumph, it was born of deep personal anguish, and caused a massive rift in author Alan Milne’s relationship with his young son. Read Full Review…

 

22. The Big Sick

The Big Sick (2017) Kumail (Kumail Nanjiani), in the middle of becoming a budding stand-up comedian, meets Emily (Zoe Kazan). Meanwhile, a sudden illness sets in forcing Emily to be put into a medically-induced coma.

Kumail must navigate being a comedian, dealing with tragic illness, and placating his family’s desire to let them fix him up with a spouse, while contemplating and figuring out who he really is and what he truly believes. Watch Now…

Review: DetroitNews

“The Big Sick” is a charming romantic comedy whose romance and comedy is abruptly interrupted by real life.

Comedian and actor Kumail Nanjiani writes and stars in the true story of his courtship with Emily V. Gordon, which was thrown for a loop when Gordon (who also co-wrote the script) contracted a mysterious illness and fell into a coma. Read Full Review…

 

23. Victoria and Abdul

Victoria and Abdul (2017) Queen Victoria strikes up an unlikely friendship with a young Indian clerk named Abdul Karim. Get One Here….

Review: The NewYorker

At the start of “Fargo” (1996), the Coen brothers, keeping the straightest of faces, informed us, “This is a true story,” and proceeded to unwrap a pack of delicious lies.

Moviegoers, of all people, should know that truth is not to be trusted; yet we are credulous creatures, with a sweet tooth for the authentic, and so, week after week, directors continue to reassure us that what we are about to witness is rooted in fact. Read Full Review…

 

24. Wonder Woman

Before she was Wonder Woman, she was Diana, princess of the Amazons, trained to be an unconquerable warrior. Raised on a sheltered island paradise, when a pilot crashes on their shores and tells of a massive conflict raging in the outside world, Diana leaves her home, convinced she can stop the threat. Fighting alongside man in a war to end all wars, Diana will discover her full powers and her true destiny. Watch Now…

Review: 7M Pictures

Continuing the string of PG-13 adventures with the DC Comics superheroes, “Wonder Woman” is a one-shot film telling the origin of the legendary Amazon warrior. The Amazons have lived without men for centuries, but when Ares, the God of War, escapes, they must try to capture him. Read Full Review…

 

25. Pacific Rim Uprising

The globe-spanning conflict between otherworldly monsters of mass destruction and the human-piloted super-machines built to vanquish them was only a prelude to the all-out assault on humanity in Pacific Rim Uprising.

Review: The Detroit News

“Pacific Rim Uprising” returns to the world of giant fightin’ robots that was introduced in 2013’s “Pacific Rim.” That earlier film was director Guillermo del Toro’s mash-up of “Top Gun” and “Godzilla,” a spirited celebration of monster and military movie clichés. This sequel continues inside the same basic framework, with less inventive moxie and a more workmanlike attitude. Read Full Review…

 

26. Spider-Man: Homecoming

Thrilled by his experience with the Avengers, Peter returns home, where he lives with his Aunt May, under the watchful eye of his new mentor Tony Stark, Peter tries to fall back into his normal daily routine – distracted by thoughts of proving himself to be more than just your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man – but when the Vulture emerges as a new villain, everything that Peter holds most important will be threatened. Movie Is Available Here…

Review: Salon

Inside the theater, the audience seemed to be having a fantastic time. Men and women of all races, skewing young, laughing at the right cues, gasping at the appropriate plot twists and cheering when the credits began to roll. Read Full Review…

 

27. Alien: Covenant

The crew of the colony ship Covenant, bound for a remote planet on the far side of the galaxy, discovers what they think is an uncharted paradise, but is actually a dark, dangerous world. When they uncover a threat beyond their imagination, they must attempt a harrowing escape. Available Here…

Review: MTV News

The spaceship Covenant, director Ridley Scott’s latest flying deathtrap, carries 15 crew members, 2,000 colonists, 1,400 embryos, and zero pandas.

Pandas insist on eating empty-calorie bamboo — they’re bears denying their carnivorous biology to chow down on 20-foot celery — and procreate so apathetically that cubs become Earth celebrities. Read Full Review…

 

28. The Beguiled

The Beguiled (2017) The unexpected arrival of a wounded Union soldier at a girls’ school in Virginia during the American Civil War leads to jealousy and betrayal. Watch Online….

Review: Clclt

The motion picture as mood ring, Ashes of Time Redux is another Wong Kar Wei production that relies as much (if not more) on the sensations created by its aural and visual flourishes than on any narrative devices.

Originally released in 1994 as Ashes of Time, the movie has since faced challenges both from within (a deteriorating negative) and without (bootleg copies all over the planet). Read Full Review…

 

29. Hocus Pocus

After three centuries, three witch sisters are resurrected in Salem Massachusetts on Halloween night, and it is up to two teen-agers, a young girl, and an immortal cat to put an end to the witches’ reign of terror once and for all. Watch Online…

Review: Chicagotribune

The motion picture as mood ring, Ashes of Time Redux is another Wong Kar Wei production that relies as much (if not more) on the sensations created by its aural and visual flourishes than on any narrative devices.

Originally released in 1994 as Ashes of Time, the movie has since faced challenges both from within (a deteriorating negative) and without (bootleg copies all over the planet). Read Full Review…

 

30. The Mummy

The Mummy (2017) Though safely entombed in a crypt deep beneath the unforgiving desert, an ancient princess, whose destiny was unjustly taken from her, is awakened in our current day bringing with her malevolence grown over millennia, and terrors that defy human comprehension. Click Here…

Review: CSMonitor

Alex Kurtzman’s “The Mummy” reboots a franchise I would gladly have dispensed with from the start. The lackluster new incarnation, starring Tom Cruise as a wisecracking Army sergeant who loots antiquities from Iraqi war zones, is a generic summer time-killer that, alas, is positioned to bequeath sequels into the foreseeable future. Read Full Review…

 

31. The Mountain Between Us

Stranded after a tragic plane crash, two strangers must forge a connection to survive the extreme elements of a remote snow covered mountain. When they realize help is not coming, they embark on a perilous journey across hundreds of miles of wilderness, pushing one another to endure and discovering strength they never knew possible.Watch Online Here…

Review: The New Republic

The best moment in the new survival drama The Mountain Between Us is when a cellphone rings. Ben (Idris Elba) and Alex (Kate Winslet) are stranded up a mountain after a plane crash, her phone smashed and his without signal. As the signature iPhone ringtone warbled around the movie theater, the audience drew in their breath: They’re saved! But no. It was just an elderly attendee who picked up his phone to stage-whisper, “I’m in a movie.” Read Full Review…

 

32. Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales

Jack is back, and this time around, he’s after an artifact that is believed to be incredibly powerful. It’s the Trident of Poseidon, and it can control the oceans. Obviously, the agile captain is not the only one hunting for this weapon – he’s got Salazar and a bunch of brutal ghost pirates rushing towards the Trident, and if Sparrow fails, the world will turn into a war zone. Watch Online…

Review: New Year Post

Welcome to the fifth — and, Davy Jones willing, the last — installment of this franchise: “Pirates of the Caribbean: Johnny Depp Is Bad With Money.”

It’s a little less cute these days to watch his Jack Sparrow swish about drunkenly, knowing the actor’s been accused of being an abusive lush. Equally wearisome is the spectacle of a once-entertaining franchise staggering around, devoid of purpose. Read Full Review…

 

33. Wind River – 2017

There’s been a murder on one of the Native-American reservations, and it’s up to a decorated agent with the Bureau to investigate the case and find the ones responsible. She’s aided by the townlet’s hard-boiled game tracker, and together they’ll have to get to the bottom of it. The people at the reservation were forced to live there – for centuries now.  Watch Now…

Review: The Detroit News

“Wind River” opens with the stark image of a woman running barefoot across the frozen emptiness in wide-open Wyoming. The particulars of who she is, where she is and why she’s running are the subject of this gritty, dense, superbly realized crime procedural that ranks among the year’s best films. Read Full Review…

 

34. Home Again

The lovely Reese Witherspoon did a fantastic job portraying a modern-day single mother in America. She’s raising two beautiful daughters and is ready to do whatever it takes to make them happy. After a nasty divorce, she goes back to LA to start over. While celebrating her birthday (she’s 40-years-old now), the woman meets 3 good-looking fellas, striving moviemakers in desperate need of a place to crash. Alice offers them the guest house for a couple of days until the boys find something more permanent. Obviously, the single mom could’ve never expected that this would turn into a romantic journey. But when her ex-man comes knocking at the door with a suitcase, everything goes to hell. Available Here…

Review: The Globe and Mail

At the beginning of Home Again, director David (Sudz) Sutherland tells us that every year 3,000 immigrants are deported back to Jamaica from countries such as Canada, the United States, Britain and Australia. Often, they are long-established residents convicted of minor crimes who have had little connection with their putative homeland since childhood. Read Full Review…

 

35. Jeepers Creepers III

Sheriff Dan Tashtego and a team of creeper hunters enlist the help of officer Davis Tubbs to help stop the monster’s eating spree. Watch Now…

Review: Reel Film Review

Though it features an absolutely fantastic premise, Clownhouse feels as though it’d be much more effective as a 22-minute episode of Tales from the Crypt (rather than a padded-out, frequently dull 81-minute movie).

Young Casey (Nathan Forrest Winters) has a terrible fear of clowns, something his cruel older brother (played by Sam Rockwell) enjoys teasing him about. Read Full Review…

 

36. Mother!

He and She are in love and thankful for every single day they get to spend with each other. A married couple with no ups and downs, they’re about to go through the ultimate test when a bunch of unwanted guests enters their calm, peaceful and uneventful lives. Available Here…

 

37. The Babysitter

The events of one evening take an unexpected turn for the worst for a young boy trying to spy on his babysitter. A teenage babysitter is the focus of two boys and a man’s separate obsessions. Watch Online….

Review: The Star

The script has a stale air, like something that was doing the rounds for a long time before David Ross found backers to make a film out of it. In the end, it was produced by the same company that brought us a clever urban romance, Raising Victor Vargas (2002). Read Full Review…

 

38. Beauty and the Beast

Disney’s animated classic takes on a new form, with a widened mythology and an all-star cast. A young prince, imprisoned in the form of a beast, can be freed only by true love. What may be his only opportunity arrives when he meets Belle, the only human girl to ever visit the castle since it was enchanted. Watch Now…

Review: The Seattle Times

Both movies achieve their G-rated goals, but Disney’s retelling of this much-filmed fairy tale feels more like a classic. It’s exceptionally difficult to make an audience care for animated characters unless they’re mermaids or anthropomorphized animals or insects, yet the Disney animators, with a big assist from the vocal talents of a superb cast, have pulled it off. Read Full Review…

 

39. Annabelle: Creation

Several years after the tragic death of their little girl, a dollmaker and his wife welcome a nun and several girls from a shuttered orphanage into their home, soon becoming the target of the dollmaker’s possessed creation, Annabelle. Available Here…

Review: IndieWire

Forget The Dark Universe. The best horror franchise currently in play belongs to James Wan, whose “The Conjuring” spin-offs delivers a world filled with nightmarish creatures like The Crooked Man, The Nun, and a doll that could make even Chucky’s blood run cold. Welcome to the frightful terrain of “Annabelle,” now equipped with a whole movie to provide its backstory. Read Full Review…

 

40. Better Watch Out

On a quiet suburban street, a babysitter must defend a twelve-year-old boy from intruders, only to discover it’s far from a normal home invasion. Watch Online….

Review: Village Voice

The recipe for a perfect Christmas horror film — think the 1974 classic Black Christmas or 2010’s more arty, Finnish offering Rare Exports — calls for dark humor, at least one scene of bright-red blood on snow, some kind of creepy Christmas toy or ornament, and a healthy dollop of irreverence for such a sacred season. Read Full Review…

Source: imdb

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