Watch Movie The ” Life Is Beautiful” This Weekend On Amazon Prime

When an open-minded Jewish librarian and his son become victims of the Holocaust, he uses a perfect mixture of will, humor, and imagination to protect his son from the dangers around their camp.

In 1930s Italy, a carefree Jewish book keeper named Guido starts a fairy tale life by courting and marrying a lovely woman from a nearby city. Guido and his wife have a son and live happily together until the occupation of Italy by German forces. In an attempt to hold his family together and help his son survive the horrors of a Jewish Concentration Camp, Guido imagines that the Holocaust is a game and that the grand prize for winning is a tank.




Watch Trailer Of Movie ” Life Is Beautiful” Here

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

 

Movie Reviews: “Life Is Beautiful

Movie Review: Chicago Sun-Times

Life is beautiful

Some people become clowns; others have clownhood thrust upon them. It is impossible to regard Roberto Benigni without imagining him as a boy in school, already a cutup, using humor to deflect criticism and confuse his enemies. He looks goofy and knows how he looks. I saw him once in a line at airport customs, subtly turning a roomful of tired and impatient travelers into an audience for a subtle pantomime in which he was the weariest and most put-upon. We had to smile.

“Life Is Beautiful” is the role he was born to play. The film falls into two parts. One is pure comedy. The other smiles through tears. Benigni, who also directed and co-wrote the movie, stars as Guido, a hotel waiter in Italy in the 1930s. Watching his adventures, we are reminded of Chaplin. And over it all hovers Anderson, the Master Framer himself. 2014.

For Full Movie Review, Click Here.

 

Movie Review: Entertainment Weekly

Life is beautiful

Roberto Benigni’s Life Is Beautiful is undeniably some sort of feat — the first feel-good Holocaust weepie. It’s been a long time coming. Any veteran art-house patron will probably, by now, have sat through more films about the Holocaust than he or she can count. The reason hardly needs stating — it’s the defining atrocity of the 20th century — yet these movies have also come to constitute a kind of cinematic universe unto themselves.

It’s that universe, I think, that begets a picture like Life Is Beautiful, which has the audacity — or is it insensitivity? — to place its lovable clownish hero in a death camp that looks like something out of a ’50s musical. You’ll laugh! You’ll cry! You’ll smile through the evils of genocide!

For Full Movie Review, Click Here. 

 

Movie Review: ColeSmithey

Life is beautiful

The first act sets up Benigni’s perpetually romantic Jewish character Guido Orefice. Fresh from the countryside, Guido gets a job working as a waiter in a posh hotel in Arezzo, Italy in 1939. A series of coincidental and surreptitiously intentional meetings with his idealized incarnation of femininity, Dora (played by Benigni’s real life wife Nicoletta Braschi), puts Guido through a series of socially awkward situations involving the creeping antisemitism of Mussolini’s fascist regime.

An impromptu lesson for grade-school children regarding the “superior race” allows Benigni, the guileless clown, to send up hypocrisies of the fatally-flawed concept with an innocent approach that is disarming in its simplicity. The Jewish character, assigned by “racist Italian scientists,” flaunts his perfect “Aryan” navel and ear lobes as physical traits to be admired. Such pithy sarcasm about the root of the Nazi mindset, as delivered by a Jewish character, arrives like a breath of pure oxygen in a coalmine.

For Full Movie Review, Click Here.

 

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

Facebook Comment

Get more stuff like this In your inbox!