Lifestyle

A Sassy Guide To Fun And Creative Outdoor Photography

Creative Outdoor Photography

Published on March 16th, 2021

Creative photography is intensive and involves seeing objects in a way that others don’t. It’s about seeing things like you were observing them for the very first time.

If you’d like to experience your photos with a refreshing element, engage the amazing services of affordable photographers and you’ll never look at your photos the same way again.

How To Capture Great Portrait Shots

To achieve fun and creative outdoor photography, certain guidelines ought to be in place. This article will guide you and help you achieve your own magical shots, even if you are an amateur.

1. Keep Obstructions Out Of Your Shot

Taking a photo that has distractions in the background removes the main focus from the subject of your shot.

Pieces of garbage, road signs, hanging power lines, and even trees can change your image’s focal point. Focus on the eyes and keep the observer captivated on the whole image.

2. Focus On The Eyes

Any good portrait photo focuses on the eyes. They are not only the most critical part of an excellent portrait, but they display the sharpest facial feature. A wide aperture value shot with a focus on the subject’s eyes will help soften the skin.

3. Avoid Direct Sunlight

Shooting in the shade prevents the sun’s harshness, which can create unwanted shadows and unstable white balance conditions.

Direct sunlight will also cause your photo subject to squint and may also camouflage certain natural features of your subject. With appropriate white balance and correct exposure, you can create some of the most magnificent images.

4. Control Your Shot by Having One Focus Point

When taking a photo, your camera’s autofocus feature is designed to select a cluster of points to focus on. It uses the average distance between focus points as a basis, selecting whatever item is nearest to the lens.

This feature will do your portrait photos a great disservice. Instead, take control and select one focus point.

5. Maintain a Minimal Focal Length of 70mm

You have likely seen portrait photos where the face looks swollen or larger than life. The shot was likely taken at a focal length of less than 50mm. Anything below 70mm will probably distort your photo’s subject.

A telephoto lens will likely increase the blurry effect due to the compression consequence.

6. An Overcast Day is Beneficial

Shooting on a day when the sky is heavy with clouds can help enrich the colours of your photos. Heavy cloud cover will offer your shots good, smooth shadows, beneficial to creating great photos.

7. Shoot Wide

Outdoor photography is most ideal when you shoot wide as it creates a shallow depth of field. However, this will require you to have a fast lens that has the capacity for wide aperture values.

The most outstanding natural light portraits are captured with lenses with wide aperture values. This is due to the fantastic smooth background blur, referred to by photographers as ‘bokeh.’

8. Use Bright Light

Attempt to mimic the studio light effect when taking outdoor photos by controlling the sun’s direction. You can achieve this by using some form of a reflector.

If you are taking silhouette shots, have the sun directly behind the subject. Otherwise, you standing with your back to the sun and the subject right in front of you creates great results, especially if they are looking away from the camera and sun.

9. Be Keen on The Format You Use

Taking photos in either RAW or JPEG formats has dire consequences. During the exposure time, your sensor’s data is unmodified.

This compilation is termed RAW. You lose more data with each edit to a JPG. With RAW, a wide range of edits can be made before you create the JPG.

In Conclusion

As a photographer, you don’t just see birds flying in the air, trees aligned along the street, flowers blossoming, or stones at the top of a wild mountain. You see previously photographed scenes in a fresh way.

It’s one of the great pleasures of outdoor photography, establishing this novelty in pictures.