Travel

100 Most Breathtaking Islands That Are Perfect Destinations For Nature Lovers

Islands To Visit

Published on June 22nd, 2021

“When you’re on one of the Caribbean islands, sometimes it’s hard to picture how they fit with the rest, but when you see them all joined together like a necklace from space, you see the natural geographic connectedness of them all.”

— Chris Hadfield

These 100 islands have spectacular beauty, and most influential travel bloggers and experts recommend all nature lovers to visit these places to discover beautiful beaches, sun, great food, rainforests, and turquoise blue waters.

1. American Samoa

American Samoa is a U.S. territory covering 7 South Pacific islands and atolls. Tutuila, the largest island, is home to the capital Pago Pago, whose natural harbor is framed by volcanic peaks including 1,716-ft.-high Rainmaker Mountain. Divided between the islands Tutuila, Ofu and Ta‘ū, the National Park of American Samoa highlights the territory’s tropical scenery with rainforests, beaches and reefs.

 

2. Anglesey, Wales

Anglesey is an island in Wales, off the mainland’s northwest coast. It’s known for its beaches and ancient sites. The island is accessed by the 19th-century Menai Suspension Bridge and the Britannia Bridge, rebuilt in the 20th century. In the medieval town of Beaumaris, 13th-century Beaumaris Castle has concentric fortifications and a moat. Beaumaris Gaol has Victorian punishment cells and an original tread wheel.

Anglesey was known as the ‘breadbasket of Wales’ or ‘Môn Mam Cymru’ (Mother of Wales) in the Middle Ages due to its abundance of fertile land that literally filled the breadbaskets of the inhabitants of North Wales. This is why you’ll find the remains of many a windmill on Anglesey.

 

3. Antigua

Antigua is one of the 2 major islands that make up the Caribbean nation of Antigua and Barbuda. Ringed with coral reefs, the island is known for its many sandy beaches. Set along English Harbour, restored Nelson’s Dockyard, which Admiral Horatio Nelson made his base in the 1780s, includes a marina and the Dockyard Museum. Trails lead up to Shirley Heights, a former military lookout with panoramic views.

 

4. Bali

Bali is an Indonesian island known for its forested volcanic mountains, iconic rice paddies, beaches and coral reefs. The island is home to religious sites such as cliffside Uluwatu Temple. To the south, the beachside city of Kuta has lively bars, while Seminyak, Sanur and Nusa Dua are popular resort towns. The island is also known for its yoga and meditation retreats.

 

5. Barbados

Barbados

Barbados is an eastern Caribbean island and an independent British Commonwealth nation. Bridgetown, the capital, is a cruise-ship port with colonial buildings and Nidhe Israel, a synagogue founded in 1654. Around the island are beaches, botanical gardens, the Harrison’s Cave formation, and 17th-century plantation houses like St. Nicholas Abbey. Local traditions include afternoon tea and cricket, the national sport.

 

6. Bazaruto Archipelago, Mozambique

The Bazaruto Archipelago is a group of 6 islands off the coast of southern Mozambique. They lie within Bazaruto National Park and are known for their white-sand beaches. Bazaruto, with sand dunes, is the largest island. Coral reefs around Magaruque and Santa Carolina islands protect rare marine animals, like dugongs. The wetlands, forests and grasslands of Benguerra Island’s interior are home to many bird species.

 

7. Belize

Belize is a nation on the eastern coast of Central America, with Caribbean Sea shorelines to the east and dense jungle to the west. Offshore, the massive Belize Barrier Reef, dotted with hundreds of low-lying islands called cayes, hosts rich marine life. Belize’s jungle areas are home to Mayan ruins like Caracol, renowned for its towering pyramid; lagoon-side Lamanai; and Altun Ha, just outside Belize City.

 

8. Bonaire

Bonaire, an island municipality of the Netherlands, lies off Venezuela’s coast in the southern Caribbean. Its reef-lined coast is protected by Bonaire National Marine Park. Beyond its rich marine life, the island shelters lizards, donkeys and birds within its immense Washington Slagbaai National Park, marked by beaches, lagoons, caverns and desert-like hills.

Bonaire is best known for spectacular scuba diving and an unparalleled commitment to marine conservation, resulting in thriving coral, hundreds of species of fish and more turtles than you can count.

 

9. Capri

Capri, an island in Italy’s Bay of Naples, is famed for its rugged landscape, upscale hotels and shopping, from designer fashions to limoncello and handmade leather sandals. One of its best-known natural sites is the Blue Grotto, a dark cavern where the sea glows electric blue, the result of sunlight passing through an underwater cave. In summer, Capri’s dramatic, cove-studded coastline draws many yachts.

The island of Capri is famous for many reasons. It has jaw-dropping natural beauty, delicious cuisine and world-class shopping. It’s also a place to see and be seen – there’s a reason why so many celebrities anchor their yachts in Marina Grande.

 

10. Corsica

Corsica, a mountainous Mediterranean island, presents a mix of stylish coastal towns, dense forest and craggy peaks (Monte Cinto is the highest). Nearly half the island falls within a park whose hiking trails include the challenging GR 20. Its beaches range from busy Pietracorbara to remote Saleccia and Rondinara. It’s been part of France since 1768, but retains a distinct Italian culture.

Corsica is famous for beautiful sandy beaches, with crystal clear, turquoise blue waters. Some of our favourites include Calvi and Loto in the north and Palombaggia and Pinarello in the south. You can read about these and more in our blog post, Top 10 beaches in Corsica.

 

11. Cozumel, Mexico

Cozumel, a mostly undeveloped Mexican island in the Caribbean Sea, is a popular cruise ship port of call famed for its scuba diving. At Arrecifes de Cozumel National Park, there’s diving spots around a section of the Mesoamerican Reef and the Museo Subacuático de Arte’s submerged sculptures. Chankanaab is an eco park surrounding a lagoon with underwater caverns, home to dolphins, manatees and sea turtles.

 

12. Curacao

Curaçao, a Dutch Caribbean island, is known for its beaches tucked into coves and its expansive coral reefs rich with marine life. The capital, Willemstad, has pastel-colored colonial architecture, floating Queen Emma Bridge and the sand-floored, 17th-century Mikvé Israel-Emanuel Synagogue. It’s also a gateway to western beaches like Blue Bay, a popular diving site.

 

13. Cyprus

Cyprus, officially called the Republic of Cyprus, is an island nation in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. It is the third largest and third most populous island in the Mediterranean, and is located south of Turkey; west of Syria; northwest of Lebanon, Israel and Palestine; north of Egypt; and southeast of Greece.

 

14. Devil’s Island, French Guiana

The penal colony of Cayenne, commonly known as Devil’s Island, was a French penal colony that operated in the 19th and 20th century in the Salvation Islands of French Guiana.

 

15. Dominica

Dominica

Dominica is a mountainous Caribbean island nation with natural hot springs and tropical rainforests. Morne Trois Pitons National Park is home to the volcanically heated, steam-covered Boiling Lake. The park also encompasses sulphur vents, the 65m-tall Trafalgar Falls and narrow Titou Gorge. To the west is Dominica’s capital, Roseau, with colorful timber houses and botanic gardens.

 

16. Falkland Islands

The Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas) are a remote South Atlantic archipelago. With rugged terrain and cliff-lined coasts, its hundreds of islands and islets are home to sheep farms and abundant birdlife. The capital, Stanley, sits on East Falkland, the largest island. The town’s Falkland Islands Museum has themed galleries devoted to maritime exploration, natural history, the 1982 Falklands War and other subjects.

 

17. Faroese Cliffs

The Faroe Islands are an island group consisting of eighteen islands between the Norwegian Sea and the North Atlantic, about half-way between Iceland and Norway. Its coordinates are 62°N 7°W. It is 1,393 square kilometres in area, and includes small lakes and rivers, but no major ones.

 

18. Fiji

Fiji, a country in the South Pacific, is an archipelago of more than 300 islands. It’s famed for rugged landscapes, palm-lined beaches and coral reefs with clear lagoons. Its major islands, Viti Levu and Vanua Levu, contain most of the population. Viti Levu is home to the capital, Suva, a port city with British colonial architecture. The Fiji Museum, in the Victorian-era Thurston Gardens, has ethnographic exhibits.

 

19. Gibraltar

Gibraltar is a British Overseas Territory and headland, on Spain’s south coast. It’s dominated by the Rock of Gibraltar, a 426m-high limestone ridge. First settled by the Moors in the Middle Ages and later ruled by Spain, the outpost was ceded to the British in 1713. Layers of fortifications include the remains of a 14th-century Moorish Castle and the 18th century Great Siege Tunnels, which were expanded in WWII.

 

20. Gran Canaria Island, Canary Islands, Spain

Gran Canaria is one of Spain’s Canary Islands, off northwestern Africa. It’s known for its black lava and white sand beaches. Its southern beaches include bustling Playa del Inglés and Puerto Rico as well as quieter Puerto de Mogán and San Agustín. In the north, capital city Las Palmas is a major stop for cruise ships and duty-free shopping. The island’s interior is rural and mountainous.

 

21. Great Britain

Great Britain is an island separated from the European mainland by the English Channel and North Sea. It comprises the nations of England, Scotland and Wales. Its long history is evident in prehistoric sites such as Neolithic Stonehenge and medieval castles like those at Warwick, Dover and Caernarfon. Roman ruins include Hadrian’s Wall, which once divided Roman Britain from the northern Scottish Lowlands.

 

22. Grenada

Grenada is a Caribbean country comprising a main island, also called Grenada, and smaller surrounding islands. Dubbed the “Spice Isle,” the hilly main island is home to numerous nutmeg plantations. It’s also the site of the capital, St. George’s, whose colourful homes, Georgian buildings and early-18th-century Fort George overlook narrow Carenage Harbour. To the south is Grand Anse Beach, with resorts and bars.

 

23. Guadeloupe (Red)

Guadeloupe, an overseas region and department of France located in the Caribbean, has no flag with official status other than the French national flag. In addition to the French flag, an inscribed regional logo on a white field is often used as regional flag, similar to the practice in Mayotte and Réunion. The logo of Guadeloupe shows a stylized sun and bird on a green and light blue square with the subscript REGION GUADELOUPE underlined in yellow.

 

24. Guernsey

Guernsey is one of the Channel Islands in the English Channel near the French coast, and is a self-governing British Crown dependency. It’s known for beach resorts like Cobo Bay and the scenery of its coastal cliffs. Castle Cornet, a 13th-century harbor fortification in the capital of St. Peter Port, now contains history and military museums. Hauteville House is the lavish former home of French writer, Victor Hugo.

 

25. Half Moon Cay, Bahamas

Little San Salvador Island, also called Half Moon Cay, is a tiny private island in the Bahamas. Accessible by cruise ship, it’s known for the long, crescent-shaped Half Moon Beach. Luxury cabanas dot the beachfront, which gives way to trail-lined country rich in birdlife. Half Moon Lagoon Aqua Park has water slides and playgrounds. Stingray Cove, a lagoon enclosure, is home to tame stingrays.

 

26. Hamilton Island, QLD, Australia

Hamilton Island is one of the Whitsunday Islands in Queensland, Australia, close to the Great Barrier Reef. Most of the car-free island is covered in bushland, and the coast is fringed by coral reefs. Tours offer up-close sightings of koalas, kangaroos, wallabies and kookaburras. Trails lead up to Passage Peak in the east, with views of the surrounding islands.

Hamilton Island in The Whitsundays is one of Australia’s most spectacular and sought-after holiday destinations. You will be surrounded by pristine beaches and a kaleidoscope of coral and marine life. Hamilton Island is a perfect base for exploring the Great Barrier Reef and world-famous Whitehaven Beach.

 

27. Hilo, Hawaii

Hilo is a town on Hawaii, commonly called the Big Island, in the state of Hawaii. It’s known for Wailuku River State Park, featuring Waianuenue, or Rainbow Falls, with its colorful mist effects. The bubbling basalt-lava rock pools known as the Boiling Pots are nearby. To the south is Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, home to rainforests and the active Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes.

A busy farming and fishing area in early times, Hilo evolved into a commercial center for the sugar industry in the 1800s. Downtown Hilo was built around its crescent-shaped bay and became the seat of county government. Today, Downtown Hilo is a charming town offering museums, art galleries, shops and restaurants.

 

28. Hispaniola, Haiti and Dominican Republic

The Dominican Republic is a Caribbean nation that shares the island of Hispaniola with Haiti to the west. It’s known for its beaches, resorts and golfing. Its terrain comprises rainforest, savannah and highlands, including Pico Duarte, the Caribbean’s tallest mountain. Capital city Santo Domingo has Spanish landmarks like the Gothic Catedral Primada de America dating back 5 centuries in its Zona Colonial district.

 

29. Hong Kong

Hong Kong, officially the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China, is a metropolitan area and special administrative region of China on the eastern Pearl River Delta in South China.

 

30. Honshu, Japan

Honshu is Japan’s main island and home to most of the country’s major cities and cultural sites. On the east coast is the Japanese capital, Tokyo, a busy global hub for finance, industry, fashion and cuisine. Mount Fuji, an iconic, snow-capped volcano, lies southwest of the city. In central Honshu, the city of Kyoto is famed for its Zen temples, gardens lined with cherry blossoms and traditional geisha entertainment.

Honshu is regarded as the Japanese mainland. Much of the country’s early history took place in its southern region. The Pacific coast is the country’s main economic centre, lined with the metropolitan areas of Tokyo–Yokohama and Ōsaka–Kōbe.

 

31. Hydra

Hydra, or Ydra or Idra, is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece, located in the Aegean Sea between the Myrtoan Sea and the Argolic Gulf. It is separated from the Peloponnese by a narrow strip of water. In ancient times, the island was known as Hydrea, a reference to the natural springs on the island.

Widely known as one of the most beautiful islands in Greece, Hydra makes up part of the Saronic Islands and is only one hour with the hydrofoil or two hours by ferry from Piraeus. Its most famous for its fine architecture, pebbly beaches and its captivating character.

 

32. Iceland

Iceland, a Nordic island nation, is defined by its dramatic landscape with volcanoes, geysers, hot springs and lava fields. Massive glaciers are protected in Vatnajökull and Snæfellsjökull national parks. Most of the population lives in the capital, Reykjavik, which runs on geothermal power and is home to the National and Saga museums, tracing Iceland’s Viking history.

Iceland is famous for being called the Land of Fire and Ice because of its volcanoes and glaciers. It is dotted with natural wonders such as The Blue Lagoon and Dettifoss Waterfall. Iceland is also known for its rich cultural history, Norse mythology, folklore, and having no official family names!

 

33. Inhaca Island, Mozambique

Inhaca Island is a subtropical island of Mozambique off the East African coast. The main village is Inhaca, situated just over a kilometer from Inhaca Airport. Various tourist lodges are situated along the northwestern coastline.

 

34. Iona, Scotland

Iona, Scotland

Iona is a small island in the Inner Hebrides, off the Ross of Mull on the western coast of Scotland. It is mainly known for Iona Abbey, though there are other buildings on the island.

Iona is a holy isle and has been described as the birthplace of Christianity in Scotland. St Columba and 12 companions came here from Ireland in AD 563. The monastery they founded was one of the most important and influential in the British Isles.

 

35. Ireland

Ireland is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George’s Channel. Ireland is the second-largest island of the British Isles, the third-largest in Europe, and the twentieth-largest on Earth.

 

36. Isle of Man

The Isle of Man is a self-governing British Crown dependency in the Irish Sea between England and Ireland. It’s known for its rugged coastline, medieval castles and rural landscape, rising to a mountainous center. In the capital, Douglas, the Manx Museum traces the island’s Celtic and Viking heritage. The Isle of Man TT is a major annual cross-country motorcycle race around the island.

 

37. Isle of Mull

The Isle of Mull or just Mull is the second-largest island of the Inner Hebrides and lies off the west coast of Scotland in the council area of Argyll and Bute. Covering 875.35 square kilometres, Mull is the fourth-largest island in Scotland – and also in the United Kingdom as a whole.

The Isle of Mull has become well known by all who view the BBC programmes Springwatch and Coast. The presenter Gordon Buchanan is from Mull and still has family and a house here. Mull is also now very well known as the home of the CBeebies programme Balamory, based around the coloured houses of Tobermory.

 

38. Isle of Sheppey

The Isle of Sheppey is an island off the northern coast of Kent, England, neighbouring the Thames Estuary, centred 42 miles from central London. It has an area of 36 square miles. The island forms part of the local government district of Swale. Sheppey is derived from Old English Sceapig, meaning “Sheep Island”.

Dubbed Kent’s Treasure Island, the Isle of Sheppey offers adventure and a great escape; from sandy beaches to mind-expanding marshes and bird-packed reserves. Ride the waves at Minster Leas and the Isle of Sheppey Sailing Club in Sheerness, or go kayaking, boating and kiting at Barton’s Point Coastal Park.

 

39. Isle of Skye

The Isle of Skye, connected to Scotland’s northwest coast by bridge, is known for its rugged landscapes, picturesque fishing villages and medieval castles. The largest island in the Inner Hebrides archipelago, it has an indented coastline of peninsulas and narrow lochs, radiating out from a mountainous interior. The town of Portree, a base for exploring the island, features harbourside pubs and boutiques.

The Island of Skye is situated off the West Coast of mainland Scotland. It is the largest and best known of the Inner Hebrides; Skye is renowned for its natural beauty, history and wildlife. IsleofSkye.com is the original and longest running website representing Skye.

 

40. Isle of Wight

Isle of wight

The Isle of Wight is an island off the south coast of England. It’s known for its beaches and seafront promenades such as sandy Shanklin Beach and south-facing Ventnor Beach, which is dotted with vintage beach huts. Dinosaur remains and fossils can be seen in areas like Compton Bay and Yaverland Beach. On the island’s western point, The Needles are 3 huge, white chalk rocks, guarded by a 19th-century lighthouse.

 

41. Jamaica

Jamaica, a Caribbean island nation, has a lush topography of mountains, rainforests and reef-lined beaches. Many of its all-inclusive resorts are clustered in Montego Bay, with its British-colonial architecture, and Negril, known for its diving and snorkeling sites. Jamaica is famed as the birthplace of reggae music, and its capital Kingston is home to the Bob Marley Museum, dedicated to the famous singer.

 

42. James Bond Island

Khao Phing Kan or Ko Khao Phing Kan is an island in Thailand, in Phang Nga Bay northeast of Phuket. About 40 metres from the shores of Khao Phing Kan lies a 20-metre tall islet called Ko Ta Pu or Ko Tapu. The islands are limestone karst towers and are a part of Ao Phang Nga National Park.

James Bond Island is a famous landmark in Phang Nga Bay. It first found its way onto the international tourist map through its starring role in the James Bond movie, The Man with the Golden Gun. … The entire area surrounding this island is indeed spectacular, but it can get crowded with tourist boats during high season.

 

43. Jersey

Jersey is the largest of the Channel Islands, between England and France. A self-governing dependency of the United Kingdom, with a mix of British and French cultures, it’s known for its beaches, cliffside walking trails, inland valleys and historic castles. The Jersey War Tunnels complex, in a former hospital excavated by slave labor, documents the island’s 5-year German occupation during WWII.

 

44. Kangaroo Island

Kangaroo Island lies off the mainland of South Australia, southwest of Adelaide. Over a third of the island is protected in nature reserves, home to native wildlife like sea lions, koalas and diverse bird species. In the west, Flinders Chase National Park is known for penguin colonies and striking coastal rock formations, like the sculpted Remarkable Rocks and the stalactite-covered Admirals Arch.

Just a short distance off the coast of South Australia, Kangaroo Island is internationally celebrated for its pristine wilderness and wildlife as well as a thriving food and wine industry. KI is Australia’s third largest island at 155 km long by 55 km wide, and over 540 kms of spectacular coastline.

 

45. Kauai, Hawaii

Kauai is an island in the Central Pacific, part of the Hawaiian archipelago. It’s nicknamed “the Garden Isle” thanks to the tropical rainforest covering much of its surface. The dramatic cliffs and pinnacles of its Na Pali Coast have served as a backdrop for major Hollywood films, while 10-mile-long Waimea Canyon and the Nounou Trails traversing the Sleeping Giant mountain ridge are hiking destinations.

Kauai, in a way, is set apart. It’s also the greenest of all the Hawaiian islands, and 97 percent of it is covered by forests or mountain ranges. It has the most dramatic landscape in its 4,000-foot-high Na Pali cliffs. And it has the biggest gorge in the Pacific, the ten-mile-long and 3,000-foot-deep Waimea Canyon.

 

46. Komodo Island – Indonesia

Komodo island, part of the Lesser Sunda chain of Indonesian islands, is the rugged habitat of the 3m-long Komodo dragon monitor lizard. Komodo National Park covers the entire region and is home to more than 4,000 dragons, and is made up of rusty-red volcanic hills, savannah and forests. Its surrounding waters of seagrass beds, mangrove shrublands and coral reefs are famous for diving.

 

47. Kowloon, Hong Kong

Kowloon encompasses the northern part of Hong Kong, on the mainland across Victoria Harbour. Once a separate city, it was acquired by Britain in 1860 and returned to China with the rest of the colony in 1997. It’s now a shopping, arts and entertainment district. Stores line Nathan Road, while traditional markets offer goods from flowers and goldfish to clothes and jade.

 

48. Langkawi, Malaysia

Langkawi, Malaysia

Langkawi, officially known as Langkawi, the Jewel of Kedah, is a district and an archipelago of 99 islands in the Malacca Strait. some 30 km off the coast of northwestern Malaysia. The islands are a part of the state of Kedah, which is adjacent to the Thai border.

Constituting 99 islands in Malaysia’s west coast, Langkawi is famous for its mystical legends, exquisite beaches, pristine rainforests and superb duty-free shopping! … Interspersed with lush tropical rainforests, the islets are also home to staggering cliffs that dramatically jut out of the turquoise placid waters.

 

49. Lanzarote, Canary Islands, Spain

Lanzarote, one of the Canary islands off the coast of West Africa administered by Spain, is known for its year-round warm weather, beaches and volcanic landscape. Timanfaya National Park’s rocky landscape was created by volcanic eruptions in the 1730s. Cueva de los Verdes has caverns formed by an underground river of lava. East-coast resort Puerto del Carmen is home to whitewashed villas, beaches and dive centers.

Lanzarote is the 4th largest of the Canary Islands, famous for its volcano-clad landscapes and palm tree-fringed beaches. It’s such a unique landscape that UNESCO declared the island a Biosphere Reserve back in 1993.

 

50. La Digue, Seychelles

La Digue is an island in the Seychelles, in the Indian Ocean off East Africa. It’s known for its beaches, like Anse Source d’Argent, dotted with granite boulders, on the west coast. To the south, isolated Anse Bonnet Carré Beach, with calm, shallow water, is accessible only on foot, as is Anse Cocos Beach, in a protected bay on the east coast. La Digue’s diverse wildlife can be seen in the Veuve Nature Reserve.

 

51. Lofoten Islands, Norway

Lofoten is a mecca for hiking, climbing, fishing, kayaking, skiing, Arctic surfing (in the summer AND winter), and cycling. The tourism scene there has a very young vibe, with lots of budget accommodation, and even the luxury accommodation markets itself towards adventure seekers.

 

52. La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain

La Palma has an area of 708 square kilometres (273 sq mi) making it the fifth largest of the eight main Canary Islands. … Its highest mountain is the Roque de los Muchachos, at 2,423 metres (7,949 ft), being second among the peaks of the Canaries only to the peaks of the Teide massif on Tenerife.

La Palma is one of Spain’s Canary Islands, off northwestern Africa. Its rugged, forested terrain is dotted with volcanoes like Teneguía and Cumbre Vieja. The island’s capital, Santa Cruz de la Palma, is a port town with narrow cobbled streets and houses with wooden balconies. The Caldera de Taburiente National Park has a huge crater-shaped formation and is covered in pine forest and cut by waterfalls.

 

53. Madagascar

Madagascar, officially the Republic of Madagascar, and previously known as the Malagasy Republic, is an island country in the Indian Ocean, approximately 400 kilometres off the coast of East Africa across the Mozambique Channel. At 592,800 square kilometres Madagascar is the world’s second-largest island country.

About 300 miles east of southern Africa, across the Mozambique Channel, lies the island of Madagascar. Best known for its lemurs (primitive relatives of monkeys, apes, and humans), colorful chameleons, stunning orchids, and towering baobab trees, Madagascar is home to some of the world’s most unique flora and fauna.

 

54. Madeira

Madeira, an autonomous region of Portugal, is an archipelago comprising 4 islands off the northwest coast of Africa. It is known for its namesake wine and warm, subtropical climate. The main island of Madeira is volcanic, green and rugged, with high cliffs, pebbly beaches and settlements on deltas of the Fajã River. Capital Funchal has botanic gardens and is known for its harbor and a large New Year’s fireworks show.

Madeira is famous for the wine that bears its name and, today, is produced in a number of varieties. Vineyards on the island were once managed by Jesuit priests. Madeira can be a dry table wine, a sweet dessert wine, or rich after-dinner drink.

 

55. Mahe, Seychelles

Mahé is the largest island in the Seychelles archipelago, in the Indian Ocean off East Africa. Its terrain is defined by white-sand beaches such as those in the popular resort area of Beau Vallon, and granite peaks including the rainforested Morne Seychellois. The island is also home to Victoria, Seychelles’ capital, known for Creole architecture and a colorful covered market with wares like fish, fruit and clothing.

 

56. Mainau Island, Lake Constance

Mainau also referred to as Mavno, Maienowe, Maienow, Maienau, Mainowe and Mainaw is an island in Lake Constance. It is maintained as a garden island and a model of excellent environmental practices.

Administratively, the island has been a part of Konstanz since December 1, 1971, when the municipality of Litzelstetten, of which Mainau was part, was incorporated into Konstanz. Mainau is still part of Litzelstetten, now one of 15 wards (administrative subdivisions) of Konstanz.

 

57. Malta

Malta is an archipelago in the central Mediterranean between Sicily and the North African coast. It’s a nation known for historic sites related to a succession of rulers including the Romans, Moors, Knights of Saint John, French and British. It has numerous fortresses, megalithic temples and the Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum, a subterranean complex of halls and burial chambers dating to circa 4000 B.C.

Malta is a tourist destination with its warm climate, numerous recreational areas, and architectural and historical monuments, including three UNESCO World Heritage Sites: Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum, Valletta, and seven megalithic temples which are some of the oldest free-standing structures in the world.

 

58. Mauritius

Mauritius, an Indian Ocean island nation, is known for its beaches, lagoons and reefs. The mountainous interior includes Black River Gorges National Park, with rainforests, waterfalls, hiking trails and wildlife like the flying fox. Capital Port Louis has sites such as the Champs de Mars horse track, Eureka plantation house and 18th-century Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam Botanical Gardens.

 

59. Mykonos

Mykonos is an island in the Cyclades group in the Aegean Sea. It’s popularly known for its summer party atmosphere. Beaches such as Paradise and Super Paradise have bars that blare thumping music. Massive dance clubs attract world-renowned DJs and typically stay open well past dawn. Iconic landmarks include a row of 16th-century windmills, which sit on a hill above Mykonos town.

Mykonos is home to lots of Greek and European restaurants, but its perhaps most famous for its Mediterranean cuisine, fresh seafood and mezze dining culture. Dishes unique to the island include kopanisti, a spicy cheese with an aromatic taste, and louza, which is made from thin slices of cooked, spicy pork.

 

60. Nevis

Nevis is the smaller of the 2 islands comprising the nation of Saint Kitts and Nevis in the Caribbean. It’s known for sandy beaches, including palm-fringed Pinney’s Beach and sheltered Oualie Beach. Booby High Shoals is a popular offshore dive site sheltering sea turtles and stingrays. The island’s capital, Charlestown, is filled with Georgian-style buildings and other British colonial relics.

 

 

61. New Brunswick, Canada

New Brunswick is one of the thirteen provinces and territories of Canada. It is one of the three Maritime provinces and one of the four Atlantic provinces. It is the only province with both French and English as its official languages.

New Brunswick is home to the largest ocean tidal whirlpool in the western hemispheres. It is located off the coast of Deer Island and is named the ‘Old Sow’. The University of New Brunswick is tied with the University of Georgia as being the oldest University in North America.

 

62. New Caledonia

New Caledonia is a French territory comprising dozens of islands in the South Pacific. It’s known for its palm-lined beaches and marine-life-rich lagoon, which, at 24,000-sq.-km, is among the world’s largest. A massive barrier reef surrounds the main island, Grand Terre, a major scuba-diving destination. The capital, Nouméa, is home to French-influenced restaurants and luxury boutiques selling Parisian fashions.

 

63. Newfoundland

Newfoundland and Labrador form the most easterly province of Canada. On Newfoundland island, the Norse archaeological site L’Anse aux Meadows is the reputed settlement of Viking explorer Leif Erikson. Gros Morne National Park, on the Gulf of St Lawrence, has cliffs, waterfalls and glacial fjords. Southeastern capital city St. John’s is known for the 17th-century Signal Hill citadel, with a hillside walking trail.

Newfoundland and Labrador has a reputation for being friendly. Warm and welcoming, fun loving and funny to the core, the people here are also known for their natural creativity, unique language, and knack for storytelling.

 

64. North Island, New Zealand

The North Island of New Zealand is known for its volcanic activity, national parks and cosmopolitan cities. Home to about three-quarters of New Zealand’s population, it has the country’s largest city, Auckland. Surrounded by bays and islands, it’s known as the “the City of Sails.” At its southern tips is harbourside capital Wellington, home to the national museum, Te Papa.

Hawke’s Bay, on New Zealand’s North Island, is known for wine, sunshine, Art Deco architecture and Cape Kidnappers, home to the world’s largest mainland colony of gannets.

 

65. Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia is one of the thirteen provinces and territories of Canada. It is one of the three Maritime provinces and one of the four Atlantic provinces. Nova Scotia is Latin for “New Scotland”. Most of the population are native English-speakers.

 

66. Oahu – Hawaii

Oahu is a U.S. island in the Central Pacific, part of the Hawaiian island chain and home to the state capital, Honolulu. Highlights of the city include historic Chinatown and the Punchbowl, a crater-turned-cemetery. Waikiki is an iconic beach, dining and nightlife area. West of Honolulu is Pearl Harbor, site of the WWII’s 1941 bombing attack and home to the USS Arizona Memorial.

In the 20th century Oahu became the centre of the U.S. Pacific Fleet. Oahu is the site of Pearl Harbor (where Japanese forces staged their first attack against the United States in World War II), Waikiki (with its world-famous beaches), and the North Shore (known for surfing).

 

67. Orkney Islands

Orkney is an archipelago off the northeastern coast of Scotland. The islands encompass Neolithic sites, tall sandstone cliffs and seal colonies. The ‘Heart of Neolithic Orkney’ is a group of 5,000-year-old sites on Mainland, the largest island including Skara Brae, a preserved village with a reconstructed house, and Maeshowe, a chambered burial tomb incorporating 12th-century Viking carvings.

 

68. Paros, Greece

Paros is a Greek island in the Aegean Sea best known for its beaches and traditional villages. Parikia, the bayside capital, is a boating and transportation hub for the Cyclades region. It’s also home to the Panagia Ekatontapiliani, a landmark Byzantine church from the 4th century A.D. The north coast’s Kolimbithres is a beach where naturally sculpted rocks form swimming coves.

Historically, Paros was known for its fine white marble, which gave rise to the term “Parian” to describe marble or china of similar qualities. Today, abandoned marble quarries and mines can be found on the island, but Paros is primarily known as a popular tourist spot.

 

69. Penang, Malaysia

Penang is a state in northwest Malaysia comprising mainland Seberang Perai and Penang Island. On the island, the state capital of George Town is home to landmarks such as colonial Fort Cornwallis, the ornate Chinese clan house Khoo Kongsi and the Kapitan Keling Mosque, all testaments to centuries of foreign influence. To the west, a funicular ascends Penang Hill, with its trails, flower gardens and panoramic views.

Nicknamed the Pearl of the Orient, Penang is famous for its soft sandy beaches and is fondly regarded as the food capital of Malaysia. Some of the most interesting sites of Penang include the sandy beaches of Tanjung Bungah, the landscape from the summit of Penang Hill and the vipers in the Snake Temple.

 

70. Phi Phi Island, Thailand

The Phi Phi Islands are an island group in Thailand between the large island of Phuket and the Straits of Malacca coast of Thailand. The islands are administratively part of Krabi Province. Ko Phi Phi Don is the largest and most populated island of the group, although the beaches of the second largest island, Ko Phi Phi Le are visited by many people as well.

The Island is probably most famous for the Leonardo Di Caprio movie “The Beach”, which was set in the stunning Maya Bay located on the uninhabited Phi Phi Leh which is the second largest of the Islands.

 

71. Phuket, Thailand

Phuket, a rainforested, mountainous island in the Andaman Sea, has some of Thailand’s most popular beaches, mainly situated along the clear waters of the western shore. The island is home to many high-end seaside resorts, spas and restaurants. Phuket City, the capital, has old shophouses and busy markets. Patong, the main resort town, has many nightclubs, bars and discos.

There are many destinations in Thailand, but Phuket remains one of the most popular. The gorgeous beaches with their breathtaking sunsets, the warm climate all year, the vibrant nightlife and the friendly people certainly make it desirable. Its history of welcoming foreign traders also plays a central role.

 

72. Praslin Island Seychelles

Praslin is an island in the Seychelles, in the Indian Ocean. It’s known for palm-fringed beaches, like Anse Georgette and Anse Lazio, both bordered by large granite boulders. The main beach, Anse Volbert-Côte D’Or, faces the offshore islet Chauve Souris. Praslin’s rugged, jungle-covered interior is home to Praslin National Park, which encompasses Vallée de Mai Nature Reserve.

Praslin is the site of the fabulous Vallée de Mai, one of Seychelles’s two UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The island features truly exquisite beaches such as Anse Lazio and Anse Georgette, both appearing on the top-10 list of world’s best beaches in recent years.

 

73. Prince Edward Island

Prince Edward Island is one of eastern Canada’s maritime provinces, off New Brunswick and Nova Scotia in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The large island is marked by red-sand beaches, lighthouses, and fertile farmland, and is renowned for seafood like lobster and mussels. Charlottetown, the capital, is home to Victorian government buildings & the modern Confederation Centre of the Arts, with a theatre and art gallery.

The smallest province in Canada, Prince Edward Island is famous for red sand beaches, red soil, potatoes, and the irrepressible Anne of Green Gables.

 

74. Princess Cay, Bahamas

Princess Cays is a tourist resort at the southern end of the island of Eleuthera, Bahamas. It is owned by Carnival Corporation, which owns Princess Cruises, among others. Carnival Corporation also owns nearby Half Moon Cay.

 

75. Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico is a Caribbean island and unincorporated U.S. territory with a landscape of mountains, waterfalls and the El Yunque tropical rainforest. In San Juan, the capital and largest city, the Isla Verde area is known for its hotel strip, beach bars and casinos. Its Old San Juan neighborhood features colorful Spanish colonial buildings and El Morro and La Fortaleza, massive, centuries-old fortresses.

The island is known for its beautiful beaches and Spanish Caribbean culture with an American twist. Bright, colorful homes line the coast, while American fast food chains can be found in larger cities like San Juan. Puerto Rico is an interesting blend of cultures with a rich history.

 

76. Reunion

Réunion Island, a French department in the Indian Ocean, is known for its volcanic, rainforested interior, coral reefs and beaches. Its most iconic landmark is Piton de la Fournaise, a climbable active volcano standing 2,632m (8,635 ft.). Piton des Neiges, a massive extinct volcano, and Réunion’s 3 calderas (natural amphitheaters formed by collapsed volcanoes), are also climbing destinations.

 

77. Robben Island

Robben Island

Robben Island is an island in Table Bay, 6.9 kilometres west of the coast of Bloubergstrand, north of Cape Town, South Africa. It takes its name from the Dutch word for seals, hence the Dutch/Afrikaans name Robbeneiland, which translates to Seal Island.

Robben Island is known for being the place former South African president Nelson Mandela was jailed for 18 of his 27 years, but the Island was the home of prisoners from outside South Africa, notably Namibia.

 

78. Sal Island, Cabo Verde

Sal is an island in Cape Verde, off the coast of West Africa. In the east, Pedra de Lume is the site of a former salt mine in the crater of an extinct volcano, with reputedly therapeutic salt water. North of the capital city, Espargos, the Terra Boa mirage appears as a lake in the desert landscape. The island’s white-sand beaches include the long, half-moon shore at Santa Maria, a busy town on the southern coast.

 

79. Santorini

Santorini is one of the Cyclades islands in the Aegean Sea. It was devastated by a volcanic eruption in the 16th century BC, forever shaping its rugged landscape. The whitewashed, cubiform houses of its 2 principal towns, Fira and Oia, cling to cliffs above an underwater caldera (crater). They overlook the sea, small islands to the west and beaches made up of black, red and white lava pebbles.

Arguably the most famous of the Greek islands, Santorini is instantly recognizable for its whitewashed, cube-shaped buildings adorned with blue accents, steep cliffs and tangerine sunsets that light up the sky and sea.

 

80. Sark

Sark is a part of the Channel Islands in the southwestern English Channel, off the coast of Normandy, France. It is a royal fief, which forms part of the Bailiwick of Guernsey, with its own set of laws based on Norman law and its own parliament. It has a population of about 500. Sark has an area of 2.10 square miles.

 

81. Shetland Isles

Shetland, also called the Shetland Islands and formerly Zetland, is a subarctic archipelago in the Northern Isles of Scotland, situated in the Northern Atlantic, between Great Britain, the Faroe Islands and Norway. It is the northernmost part of Scotland and of the wider United Kingdom.

The islands lie about 80 km (50 mi) to the northeast of Orkney, 170 km (110 mi) from Scotland and 300 km (190 mi) west of Norway. They form part of the border between the Atlantic Ocean to the west and the North Sea to the east. Their total area is 1,466 km2 (566 sq mi), and the population totalled 22,920 in 2019. The islands comprise the Shetland constituency of the Scottish Parliament.

 

82. Sicily

Sicily, the largest Mediterranean island, is just off the “toe” of Italy’s “boot.” Its rich history is reflected in sites like the Valley of the Temples, the well-preserved ruins of 7 monumental, Doric-style Greek temples, and in the Byzantine mosaics at the Cappella Palatina, a former royal chapel in capital city Palermo. On Sicily’s eastern edge is Mount Etna, one of Europe’s highest active volcanoes.

 

83. Skellig Michael, Skellig Islands, Ireland

Skellig Michael is a twin-pinnacled crag 11.6 kilometres west of the Iveragh Peninsula in County Kerry, Ireland. The island is named after the archangel Michael, while “Skellig” is derived from the Irish language word sceilig, meaning a splinter of stone. Its twin island, Little Skellig, is smaller and inaccessible.

 

84. South Island, New Zealand

The South Island of New Zealand is renowned for its mountains, lakes and glaciers. The Southern Alps, home to 3,724m-high Aoraki Mt. Cook, run along the entire length of the island. In the southwest is Fiordland National Park, with steep-sided Milford Sound. In the north is Abel Tasman National Park, known for its trails and ocean kayaking. Queenstown is famed for adventure sports like bungee jumping and skiing.

New Zealand’s South Island is larger than the North Island and generally considered more beautiful. It also has gorgeous coastline, but it is best known for the many mountains and fjords that define its inland.

 

85. Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka, formerly known as Ceylon, and officially the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka, is an island country in South Asia.

Sri Lanka’s documented history spans 3,000 years, with evidence of prehistoric human settlements dating back at least 125,000 years. It has a rich cultural heritage, and the first known Buddhist writings of Sri Lanka, the Pāli Canon, date back to the Fourth Buddhist council in 29 BCE. Its geographic location and deep harbours made it of great strategic importance from the time of the ancient Silk Road through to the modern Maritime Silk Road.

 

86. St Mary’s, Isles of Scilly

St Mary’s is the largest and most populous island of the Isles of Scilly, an archipelago off the southwest coast of Cornwall in England.

St Mary’s has an area of 6.58 square kilometres (2.54 sq mi)[1] — 40 percent of the total land area of the Isles of Scilly — this includes four small tidal islands which connect with St Mary’s at low tide: Toll’s Island, Taylor’s Island, Newford Island and the island at Innisidgen.

 

87. St Thomas (US Virgin Islands)

St. Thomas is the gateway isle of the U.S. Virgin Islands in the Caribbean. It’s known for its beaches and snorkeling spots. Territorial capital Charlotte Amalie, founded by the Danish in the 1600s, is a busy cruise-ship port. Historic buildings include a 1679 watchtower called Blackbeard’s Castle, in reference to the area’s pirate history. On the harbor, 17th-century Fort Christian is now a local-history museum.

 

88. St. Lucia

Saint Lucia is an Eastern Caribbean island nation with a pair of dramatically tapered mountains, the Pitons, on its west coast. Its coast is home to volcanic beaches, reef-diving sites, luxury resorts and fishing villages. Trails in the interior rainforest lead to waterfalls like the 15m-high Toraille, which pours over a cliff into a garden. The capital, Castries, is a popular cruise port.

 

89. St. Martin/St. Maarten

Sint Maarten, part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, is a country on the southern part of a Caribbean island shared with Saint Martin, a French overseas collectivity. Its natural features span lagoons, beaches and salt pans. The capital, Philipsburg, has cobblestone streets and colorful, colonial-style buildings lining its Front Street shopping area. The port is a popular cruise-ship stop.

Its capital Marigot has the marina and shopping, but if you’re staying on the French side you’re better off being on the beach. There are scores of good restaurants to choose from on the French side of the island.

 

90. St.John, US Virgin Islands

St. John is the smallest of the 3 U.S. Virgin Islands, which are located in the Caribbean Sea. Virgin Islands National Park occupies more than half the island. Its forests shelter resident and migratory birds, including cuckoos, warblers and hummingbirds. The mangroves at Hurricane Hole, in the east, support corals and anemones. Dolphins inhabit the island’s waters, which also host hawksbill and green turtles.

St. John is among the safest islands in the Caribbean, and probably safer than your own home town. However, crime happens everywhere, so mind your belongings and take the same care with security around the house as you would at home.

 

91. Staffa

Staffa is an island of the Inner Hebrides in Argyll and Bute, Scotland. The Vikings gave it this name as its columnar basalt reminded them of their houses, which were built from vertically placed tree-logs.

 

92. Taiwan

Taiwan, officially the Republic of China, is a country in East Asia. Neighbouring countries include the People’s Republic of China to the northwest, Japan to the northeast, and the Philippines to the south.

Taiwan is often regarded as one of the friendliest Asian countries. Not every Taiwanese person speaks English (get ready for a language barrier as soon as you leave Taipei), yet most locals are friendly, welcoming, and willing to help others. As either traveler or ex-pat, you will most likely feel welcome here.

 

93. Tasmania

Tasmania

Tasmania is an island state of Australia. It is located 240 km to the south of the Australian mainland, separated by Bass Strait. The state encompasses the main island of Tasmania, the 26th-largest island in the world, and the surrounding 1000 islands.

Tasmania is widely known for having the cleanest air in the world, and the best scenery and the richest history compared to other states in Australia.

 

94. Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain

Tenerife is the largest of Spain’s Canary Islands, off West Africa. It’s dominated by Mt. Teide, a dormant volcano that is Spain’s tallest peak. Tenerife may be best known for its Carnaval de Santa Cruz, a huge pre-Lent festival with parades, music, dancing and colorful costumes. The island has many beaches (with sands from yellow to black) and resort areas, including Los Cristianos and Playa de las Américas.

The largest of the Canary Islands, Tenerife is a paradise of sandy beaches, thrilling nightlife and idyllic villages. The island is one of Spain’s more popular tourist destinations, so be prepared to throw yourself into a cosmopolitan mix of visitors in the towns and on the beaches.

 

95. Tobago

Tobago is the smaller of the 2 Caribbean islands comprising the nation of Trinidad and Tobago. It’s known for its wide, sandy beaches and biodiverse tropical rainforest. Framed by mountains, the village-like port capital, Scarborough, is anchored by its central food market. Overlooking the city are the 18th-century ruins of Fort King George, now housing the Tobago Museum and its local art and artifacts.

Trinidad and Tobago is famous for its stable economy, steel pans, carnival festivity, Caribbean dance (Limbo), gorgeous beaches, lush greenery, musical styles, among other things”. Below you’ll find 10 things that make this island country so famous and such a desirable destination for travelers from all over the world.

 

96. Tresco, Isles of Scilly

Tresco is the second-biggest island of the Isles of Scilly in Cornwall, England. It is 297 hectares in size, measuring about 3.5 kilometres by 1.75 kilometres.

In early times one group of islands was in the possession of a confederacy of hermits. King Henry I gave it to Tavistock Abbey which established a priory on Tresco; it was abolished during the Dissolution of the Monasteries. The priory was given the care of souls in the secular islands by the lord of the fief. In 1233, a prior here, known as Alan of Cornwall, was made Abbot of Tavistock.

 

97. Vancouver Island – Canada

Vancouver Island, off Canada’s Pacific Coast, is known for its mild climate and thriving arts community. On its southern tip is Victoria, British Columbia’s capital, and its boat-lined Inner Harbour, neo-baroque Parliament Buildings, grand Fairmont Empress Hotel and English-style gardens. Harbour city Nanaimo, home of chocolate-and-custard Nanaimo bars, has an Old City Quarter with shops, galleries and restaurants.

Vancouver Island is renowned for wild, untamed beaches that are an idyllic summer sanctuary, and a hub for storm-watching and surfing in the winter.

 

98. Vanuatu

Vanuatu is a South Pacific Ocean nation made up of roughly 80 islands that stretch 1,300 kilometers. The islands offer scuba diving at coral reefs, underwater caverns and wrecks such as the WWII-era troopship SS President Coolidge. Harborside Port Vila, the nation’s capital and economic center, is on the island of Efate. The city is home to the Vanuatu National Museum, which explores the nation’s Melanesian culture.

 

99. Venice

Venice, the capital of northern Italy’s Veneto region, is built on more than 100 small islands in a lagoon in the Adriatic Sea. It has no roads, just canals – including the Grand Canal thoroughfare – lined with Renaissance and Gothic palaces. The central square, Piazza San Marco, contains St. Mark’s Basilica, which is tiled with Byzantine mosaics, and the Campanile bell tower offering views of the city’s red roofs.

Venice, known also as the “City of Canals,” “The Floating City,” and “Serenissima,” is arguably one of Italy’s most picturesque cities. With its winding canals, striking architecture, and beautiful bridges, Venice is a popular destination for travel.

 

100. Zanzibar

Unguja, also known as Zanzibar Island, is the main island in the Tanzanian archipelago of Zanzibar. Stone Town, part of Zanzibar City, is an old trade center, with mosques and winding lanes. The 1883 House of Wonders is a former sultan’s palace with a clock tower. The Old Fort now houses a cultural center and a stone amphitheater. Underground aqueducts fed hot water to the late-19th-century Hamamni Persian Baths.

Zanzibar is an archipelago of islands – the most famous being Unguja located 25 kms from the mainland coast at Dar es Salaam. The island is famous for its mix of exotic beaches, famous spice plantations, history (Stone Town being the capital) and diverse culture.