Health

How Pink Ribbons Became a Symbol of Breast Cancer Awareness

Breast Cancer

Published on November 1st, 2020

Every year in October, we get to see many campaigns related to breast cancer awareness using pink color. It comes in several shapes and forms like breast cancer awareness pins & buttons. But have you ever wondered why pink and specifically pink ribbons came about signifying breast cancer awareness?

The Story Behind Pink Ribbons

It all began in 1991 when a breast cancer survivor started distributing ribbons in peach color, attempting to raise awareness about this deadly disease.

The survivor also raised her voice against how it was mostly neglected at the federal level and how little funding this disease received to manage and battle it. Around the same time, the Komen Foundation founder picked up on the notion and began making noise for the noble cause.

However, the Komen Foundation had already been using and distributing pink ribbons since the early 1980s through to the early 1990s. They continued to do for breast cancer awareness as well.

Race For The Cure

Breast Cancer _2

Around the same time, back in 1991, Komen Foundation handed out pink visors to female participants in their “Race For A Cure” event. This is when the movement really began making noise.

Self Magazine also took notice and released a one-month inaugural issue in 1991 on Breast Cancer Awareness.

During the year 1992, Self Magazine’s chief editor coveted to create a bigger noise for the awareness of breast cancer.

She wanted to run the magazine’s second issue on Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and this time she wanted to go bigger. To do this, she affiliated with cosmetic giants and took them on board with the movement.

She convinced them to distribute specifically created pink ribbons in all their stores across New York City. And so, pink ribbons were born!

About The Color’ Pink.’

The shade of pink selected for this movement is a unique shade called “150 Pink.” This shade of pink primarily represents calm, playfulness, serenity, and life-affirming traits.

Final words:

Today, most generic shades of pink color are used for representing breast cancer awareness. Hundreds and millions of women and men alike have adapted to the movement of breast cancer awareness, and they wear it across the globe to continue raising their voice, forcing policymakers to give more funds and, most importantly, increase awareness in women of all ages and from all walks of life to understand the disease, learn to take note of any developing symptoms and so approach relevant doctors for management and treatment.