Entertainment

20 Best And Worst Horror Movies Of 2019

Best And Worst Horror Movies

Published on November 6th, 2019

Horror movies are truly entertaining. This year was no different either. Some beautiful and chilling renditions of this genre were created this year.

When these films hit the theatre people were more than impressed by the content shown. While some of these movies were spine chilling others took fear to a totally new level altogether.

As the year comes to a close end we can now scrutinize the best horror movies that we were exposed to.

We picked up those horror movies which had more than 20 reviews and were loved by the viewers. Have a look at the Best and Worst Horror Movies Of 2019 and let us know if you agree with our choice.

Mostly the movies we have picked up have impressed the viewers and critics alike and made the cash registers ring too.

Go through the list and hopefully your favorite horror material would be there too. In case there is any major title missing let us know and we are going to make amends.

1. Hagazussa

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

The dark legend of the young woman Albrun and her struggle to preserve her own sanity, and tries to explore the fine line between ancient magic, faith and madness at a time when pagan beliefs in witches and nature spirits spread fear and terror in the minds of the rural population.

Review: Roger Ebert

One of the most recent horror movies to polarize audiences was Robert Eggers’ “The Witch,” that creepy 1630s period piece with Old English dialogue, an iconic sinister goat, and a terrifying finale. But Lukas Feigelfeld’s “Hagazussa” makes “The Witch” seem as zippy as “The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” in comparison—“Hagazussa” is even more atmospheric and muted, with even less of a threat that something will jump out at you. Those are noble values for a horror movie, but it’s a shame they’ve to lead to a frustrating genre pic that’s just too dreary to be scary.

Read Full Review

 

2. US

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

In order to get away from their busy lives, the Wilson family takes a vacation to Santa Cruz, California with the plan of spending time with their friends, the Tyler family. On a day at the beach, their young son Jason almost wanders off, causing his mother Adelaide to become protective of her family. That night, four mysterious people break into Adelaide’s childhood home where they’re staying. The family is shocked to find out that the intruders look like them, only with grotesque appearances.

Review: THE AGE

Writer-director Jordan Peele rose to fame as half of the comedy team Key and Peele and his breakout hit Get Out was as much satire as horror, not least in its clarity of purpose.

While the macabre underpinnings of the meet-the-parents premise took time to emerge, it was plain right away that Peele was making a statement about racism from an African-American perspective, mocking the hypocrisy of white liberals in particular.

Read Full Review

 

3. Braid

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

Two wanted women decide to rob their wealthy psychotic friend who lives in the fantasy world they created as children; to take the money they have to take part in a deadly perverse game of make believe.

Review: Los Angeles Times

What if our games of childhood make-believe never, ever ended? Writer/director Mitzi Peirone poses the question in her feature directorial debut, the creepy, candy-coloured psychological horror “Braid.” As the daffy Daphne, Madeline Brewer, anchors this hallucinatory thriller.

Sarah Hay and Imogen Waterhouse co-star opposite Brewer as Tilda and Petula. These two bad girls escape a drug raid and skip town with a plan to score cash from their old pal Daphne, who lives alone in an old, sprawling mansion. But in order to gain entry, they have to play a treacherous game of make-believe.

Read Full Review

 

4. The Golem

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

During an outbreak of a deadly plague, a mystical woman must save her tight-knit Jewish community from foreign invaders, but the entity she conjures to protect them is a far greater evil.

Review: Hollywood Reporter

A take on Jewish folklore in which a woman gets to be the misguided conjurer for once, Doron and Yoav Paz’s The Golem is not the schlocky horror film its American marketing materials suggest. The English-language Israeli production may not wow stateside genre fans, but its approach to the source material (a close cousin to the Frankenstein tale) is emotionally and intellectually sincere, enacted seriously, if not always engrossingly, by cast and crew.

Read Full Review

 

5. The Hole In The Ground

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

Trying to escape her broken past, Sarah O’Neill is building a new life on the fringes of a backwood rural town with her young son Chris. A terrifying encounter with a mysterious neighbour shatters her fragile security, throwing Sarah into a spiralling nightmare of paranoia and mistrust, as she tries to uncover if the disturbing changes in her little boy are connected to an ominous sinkhole buried deep in the forest that borders their home.

Review: The Times

This ridiculously accomplished horror debut from the Irish director Lee Cronin was a hit at the recent Sundance Film Festival and announced the arrival of a new star in the lead actress, Seana Kerslake. It’s set in a seemingly idyllic rural community to which mum Sarah (Kerslake, two parts Shelley Duvall to three parts Scarlett Johansson) has retreated with moppet son Chris (James Quinn Markey) to escape her abusive husband (never seen).

Read Full Review

 

6. Midsommar

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

Dani (Florence Pugh) and Christian (Jack Reynor) are a young American couple with a relationship on the brink of falling apart. But after a family tragedy keeps them together, a grieving Dani invites herself to join Christian and his friends on a trip to a once-in-a-lifetime midsummer festival in a remote Swedish village. What begins as a carefree summer holiday in a land of eternal sunlight takes a sinister turn when the insular villagers invite their guests to partake in festivities that render the pastoral paradise increasingly unnerving and viscerally disturbing.

Review: BuzzFeed

The most upsetting scenes in Midsommar have nothing to do with Swedish fertility cults or their gruesome rites, and everything to do with isolation — and what someone might be willing to do to avoid it. They’re right at the top of the movie, the second from writer-director Ari Aster, when the protagonist Dani (Florence Pugh) casts around frantically for emotional reinforcement on what turns out to be the worst day of her life.

Read Full Review

 

7. Crawl

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

Against all logic, the competitive swimmer, Haley, drives into the mouth of a furiously destructive Category 5 hurricane on a collision course with her hometown of Florida, to check in on her estranged father, Dave.

There, in their weather-beaten house amid a rapidly sinking and alligator-infested town, Haley and her father find themselves trapped in the labyrinthine mess of their flooded crawl space, where a merciless pair of six-metre predators is silently stalking them.

Now–as Haley and Dave are gasping for air in the claustrophobic basement–only their will to survive can help them stand a chance against the scaly adversaries’ powerful jaws. Can they escape without getting eaten alive?

Review: The Guardian

Time just inches by during this half-arty, largely interminable horror featuring an elderly, Croatian, seemingly lobotomised version of Javier Bardem’s No Country for Old Men killer. Hot victim Georgina Haig does well not to not yawn her way through scene after scene in which tension and terror are traded for near silence and long pauses. A squeaky door steals the show.

Read Full Review

 

8. Nightmare Cinema

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

Mick Garris directs the linking sequences set in a cinema theatre where Mickey O’Rourke is the projectionist and the audience are lured in to view films which feature strangely familiar characters. The Thing in the Woods, directed by Alejandro Brugués is a pastiche which throws in every cliche from slashers to alien spiders.

Mirare directed by Joe Dante deals with the weirder aspects of cosmetic surgery philia, taking it far beyond any logical conclusion. Mashit directed by Ryûhei Kitamura takes place in a Boarding School where staff and pupils are possessed by Demons.

This Way to Egress directed by David Slade is filmed in dark monochrome, a woman loses touch with reality and seems to have crossed into a frightening parallel universe. Dead directed by Mick Garris is set in a hospital where a boy fights evil spirits and a real-life murder

Review: Chicago Sun-Times

Some of these horror shorts are more effective than others, but there’s no disputing the chilling, creepy, haunting presence of Rourke as The Projectionist, a grim reaper of the balcony who welcomes a series of guests to his old-school movie house and shows each of them a film starring … themselves. And we’re not talking happy home movies here.

The Projectionist’s theatre is like the Hotel California: You can check out any time, but you can never leave.

“Nightmare Cinema” opens with one Samantha Smith (Sarah Elizabeth Winters) approaching a theater with a marquee advertising “The Thing in the Woods” with Samantha Smith.

Read Full Review

 

9. Pledge

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

A group of college freshmen pledge an exclusive fraternity but soon realize there’s more at stake than they could have ever imagined.

Review: Variety

“Privilege comes with sacrifice,” says one character to another in “Pledge” — exactly the kind of noble sentiment authority figures always voice to hush the protests of those about to be sacrificed. This third feature for director Daniel Robbins is no delicate flower of cinematic art, but a lean and mean shocker that tells its tale of collegiate hazing run amuck with brute efficiency. IFC Midnight gave the quasi-horror meller a limited theatrical run simultaneous with its VOD launch on Jan. 11.

Read Full Review

 

10. I Trapped The Devil

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

Christmas is supposed to be a time for peace and joyful family reunions. But when Matt and his wife Karen show up unannounced at the home of his estranged brother Steve to celebrate the holidays, they are instead greeted with a horrifying surprise: trapped in the basement is a man. But not just any man. Steve believes that his hostage is none other than the devil himself.

Review: Roger Ebert

In 1960, Charles Beaumont adapted his short story “The Howling Man” for the second season of Rod Serling’s “The Twilight Zone.” In this clever chapter of arguably the most influential TV show of all time, a man is wandering through post-WWI Europe when he comes upon a castle occupied by a religious order. Surprisingly, they first refuse to allow him in, but they relent as a storm is coming.

The man learns why they didn’t want a visitor when he hears howling and comes upon a man in a cell. The man professes his innocence and claims that the Brothers are insane. The Brothers respond by claiming that the man is literally the Devil.

Read Full Review

11. Piercing

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

A man kisses his wife and baby goodbye and seemingly heads away on business, with a plan to check into a hotel, call an escort service, and kill an unsuspecting prostitute.

Review: Roger Ebert

At the risk of over-stating the obvious: every movie deserves to be judged based on what it seems to be (based on the evidence that the movie presents). Granted, any filmmaker’s goals can be dismissed if a moviegoer finds those goals to be, uh, worthless. But generally speaking: we shouldn’t try to judge a film based on our expectations, but rather what we’re looking at.

By this logic: “Piercing,” the latest horror film by music video helmer turned feature horror writer/director Nicolas Pesce, is more frustrating than it is actually bad. Because “Piercing,” an adaptation of Ryu Murakami’s novel of the same name, succeeds as a darkly comic provocation. I think. Sort of?

Read Full Review

 

12. Happy Death Day 2U

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

Having survived the farcical but utterly life-threatening events in Happy Death Day (2017), the feisty sorority sister, Tree Gelbman, finds herself in the same college dorm, thankful to be alive.

However, this time, it’s Carter’s roommate, Ryan, who claims that he is reliving the same paradoxical day over and over again, as a mysterious paranoid killer in a single-toothed baby-faced mask with a big kitchen knife has made a habit of murdering him.

Under those circumstances, a valiant but vain attempt to face the challenge, once more, will send Tree back to square one, trapped in an all too familiar and blood-drenched time loop. How many deaths separate Tree from a truly happy birthday?

Review: The Atlantic

The premise of 2017’s Happy Death Day is a perfect elevator pitch: What if Groundhog Day were a horror film? Theresa (Jessica Rothe) wakes up in a college dorm room, goes through her routine, and then dies at the hands of a masked serial killer, becoming the first murder victim of the movie.

Except when she dies, she wakes up back in that dorm, at the start of the day again, doomed to relive the experience but, perhaps, given the power to solve the mystery. The movie’s cutesy log line belies a clever undermining of genre conventions.

Theresa (nicknamed “Tree”) is very much a horror-film trope, the first casualty in a slasher flick, the character who exists only to die and to raise the narrative stakes for everyone else. In Happy Death Day, though, the action stays with her. And because of that, she eventually gets to become the hero.

Read Full Review

 

13. Annabelle Comes Home

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

Determined to keep Annabelle from wreaking more havoc, demonologists Ed and Lorraine Warren bring the possessed doll to the locked artifacts room in their home, placing her “safely” behind sacred glass and enlisting a priest’s holy blessing. But an unholy night of horror awaits as Annabelle awakens the evil spirits in the room, who all set their sights on a new target–the Warrens’ ten-year-old daughter, Judy, and her friends.

Review: Rolling Stone

Nestled somewhere in the Evil Doll Hall of Fame between Chuckie and The Twilight Zone‘s Talky Tina, the Conjuring franchise’s resident Satanic toy has enough industry juice to have knocked out three spin-off movies — not bad for a scene-stealing porcelain figure originally used as a supernatural conduit by a Manson-lite cult. (Long story.) Just don’t call it “possessed,” however, if you’re around paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren (Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga).

“Demons don’t possess things, only people,” they declare, before their car breaks down, late at night, in front of a fogged-in graveyard, right by a grisly car accident. Annabelle is more of a “beacon” for angry spirits. Wherever she goes, ghostly carnage follows. The couple is lucky to make it out alive. No wonder this dead-eyed manifestation of unholiness has to be locked up in a glass case and blessed by a priest twice a week.

Read Full Review

 

14. Child’s Play

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

After moving to a new city, young Andy Barclay receives a special present from his mother — a seemingly innocent Buddi doll that becomes his best friend. When the doll suddenly takes on a life of its own, Andy unites with other neighborhood children to stop the sinister toy from wreaking bloody havoc.

Review: Hollywood Reporter

On Nov. 9, 1988, the horror character Chucky debuted as Child’s Play hit theaters. While the technical aspects of the film were praised, the characters and material were not. The Hollywood Reporter’s original review is below:

Many horror films tread a thin line between the frightening and the absurd. Child’s Play, United Artists’ new horror film directed by Tom Holland (Fatal Beauty, Fright Night), wobbles too often on the wrong side of that line.

As a result, its box office take is likely to be equally erratic, with its best prospects being for a quick smash-and-grab, a la the method of operation of its main villain, a killer doll.

Read Full Review

 

15. ST. Agatha

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

In the 1950s in small-town Georgia, a pregnant young woman named Agatha seeks refuge in a convent. What first starts out as the perfect place to have a child turns into a nightmare wherein silence is forced, ghastly secrets are masked, and every bit of willpower Agatha has is tested as she learns the sick and twisted truth of the convent and the odd people that lurk inside its halls.

Review: Los Angeles Times

Even though he cut his teeth — so to speak — directing “Saw” sequels, Darren Lynn Bousman isn’t really a mainstream horror filmmaker. In the likes of his “Repo! The Genetic Opera” and “Allelulia! The Devil’s Carnival” Bousman’s fused comedy, music, gross-outs, social satire, and a theatricality bordering on camp.

The heightened psychological thriller “St. Agatha” (credited to four screenwriters) is one of Bousman’s more straightforward pictures; and yet it’s still pretty gonzo. Calling back to the ’60s and ’70s “psycho biddy” and “nunsploitation” sub-genres, the film frequently goes gleefully over-the-top in its depiction of cruel religious leaders and their paranoid flock.

Read Full Review

 

16. Pet Sematary

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

Louis Creed, his wife Rachel, and their two children, Gage and Ellie, move to a rural home where they are welcomed and enlightened about the eerie ‘Pet Sematary’ located nearby.

After the tragedy of their cat being killed by a truck, Louis resorts to burying it in the mysterious pet cemetery, which is definitely not as it seems, as it proves to the Creeds that sometimes, dead is better.

Review: Spoiler Free Movie Sleuth

Pet Sematary is one of Stephen King’s most terrifying stories, a tale about death and regret. The story centers around a family that has moved to a small town in Maine. Louise Creed (Dale Midkiff), Rachel (Denise Crosby), his stay-at-home wife, and his two adorable children Gage (Miko Hughes) and Ellie (Blaze Berdahl). Louise has accepted a job at the University of Maine as a doctor and is in the process of setting up his homestead in a new place. The Creed family is befriended by an amicable older gentleman (with a thick Maine accent) named Jud Crandall (Fred Gwynne) who is happy to fill them in on the local area.

Louise’s house is located right across from a busy highway that has semi-trucks whizzing by at regular intervals. Unfortunately, many a beloved pet has met their end trying to cross the road and their bodies are buried at a so-called “Pet Sematary” located at the back of the cemetery. Local legends whisper that if you bury a dead pet in a certain area then they come back to life, except they aren’t what they used to be while they were alive.

Read Full Review

 

17. Brightburn

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

What if a child from another world crash-landed on Earth, but instead of becoming a hero to mankind, he proved to be something far more sinister?

Review: THE TIMES

This is one of those movies that replaces genuine dramatic tension with long, sonorous soundtrack blasts of brass. This tendency started in 2010 in Christopher Nolan’s Inception, and has become endemic in blockbusters. “Duuuuuuuuum!” the soundtrack goes as the camera moves slowly into the face of our protagonist, 12-year-old Brandon Breyer (Jackson A Dunn). “Duuuuuuum!”

it goes again after a moment’s respite, this time louder than before. “Duuuuuuuuuum!” Even louder now, implying something — fear, dread, terror, I’m not quite sure, you can’t tell because: “Duuuuuuuuumm!” That one was the loudest of the lot, yet, despite itself, it reveals a strange logic all of its own. Because the film that this broadside of brass describes is ultimately, seriously, “Duuuumb!”

Read Full Review

 

18. MA

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

In this new psychological horror-thriller from Tate Taylor and Blumhouse, a lonely woman befriends a group of teenagers and decides to let them party at her house. Just when the kids think their luck couldn’t get any better, things start happening that make them question the intention of their crazy host.

Review: Roger Ebert

The thrills come extra cheap and late in Tate Taylor’s “Ma,” a horror movie torn between campiness and compassion, all while an Oscar-winning actress struggles to hold it together. It’s the initial ambition of the story that’s likely to keep you in your seat, as Octavia Spencer adds a wicked smile to her maternal persona and treats the mammy archetype as a predator. But as great as that all sounds, the film proves to be more shallow than its edgy premise and subsequent themes promise.

Read Full Review

 

19. Escape Room

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

Six strangers are given mysterious black boxes with tickets to an immersive escape room for a chance to win tons of money. Being locked in several rooms with extreme conditions, they discover the secrets behind the escape room and must fight to survive and to find a way out.

Review: Roger Ebert

“Escape Room,” a new PG-13-rated horror film, is a sometimes diverting, but overly familiar series of set pieces in search of a good melodrama. There’s not much of a plot: six disposable protagonists try to solve a series of inter-connected puzzles, and death is the penalty for failure.

There’s also not much reason to care if these protagonists live or die, a demerit that slightly (but notably) distinguishes “Escape Room” from what appears to be its creators’ biggest influence: the go-for-broke “Saw” movie franchise, a series of “torture porn” flicks that weirdly improved as its creators grew more desperate to keep diehard fans (and only diehard fans) interested.

The “Saw” movies are probably best remembered for their instantly dated gore. But, speaking for myself: I love their over-the-top soap opera plotting, especially in later sequels like “Saw VI” and “Saw: The Final Chapter” (the latter of which is not, as horror fans know, the last “Saw” sequel).

Read Full Review

 

20. The Curse Of La Llorona

Watch Now On Amazon Prime Video

Ignoring the eerie warning of a troubled mother suspected of child endangerment, a social worker and her own small kids are soon drawn into a frightening supernatural realm. Their only hope to survive La Llorona’s deadly wrath may be a disillusioned priest and the mysticism he practices to keep evil at bay, on the fringes where fear and faith collide.

Review: Roger Ebert

I may not have grown up with the legend of La Llorona, but I grew up with a healthy respect for superstitions and things that cannot be explained. In a number of Latinx communities, some of us give our children a piece of jewelry or amulet to ward off the evil eye (it can vary from country-to-country, as the evil eye varies from culture-to-culture). Mine is a bracelet of black and red beads that my mother bought. Even if you’re not a true believer of such curses, it’s preferable to be safe than sorry.

Read Full Review